Shelter Oklahoma Schools Donates Money to Moore, Chickasaw School Districts

Shelter Oklahoma Schools will be donating money in an effort to rebuild what was so quickly taken with a $500,000 donation to area school districts.

The $500,000 donation will go towards building safe rooms to protect students and faculty in the future. The fund will work with local schools and municipalities to build or fortify storm shelters across the state including Moore, Chickasha, southwest Oklahoma City and more.

Shelter Oklahoma Schools quickly raised money from a car dealerships in Oklahoma City, Fiat of Edmond and Edmond Hyundai, as well as $500,000 from the oil and gas company Apache Corp., who also pledged additional matching contributions.

Next week, Shelter Oklahoma Schools plans to give $100,000 to each to schools in Drummond, about 90 miles north of Oklahoma City, and Calumet, about 40 miles west of Oklahoma City. Both are building new classrooms and have since added saferooms to those plans. Along with another $100,000 to a small independent district in southwest Oklahoma City, Western Heights.

We all remember the at least 24 people –including nine children — having been taken. Since it has been announced, seven of those children were from Plaza Towers Elementary, and another school, Briarwood Elementary, was also heavily damaged. Shelter Oklahoma Schools is working to prevent this tragic loss from ever happening again.

Shelter Oklahoma Schools was created with the purpose of providing storm shelters in and around Oklahoma schools and communities.  The purpose of the fund was to help people now as well as future generations to come. Shelter Oklahoma Schools is still taking donations and will continue to help rebuild Oklahoma stronger than ever before.

All donation funds are held by the Oklahoma City Community Foundations and all of the money it collects is used to build shelters. Help us build a stronger future for our children for years to come. To learn more about Shelter Oklahoma Schools, connect with us today.

Tweet